Lybia’s Gadhaffi: the forgotten story of his links to terror

The Libyan regime, not the execution agent of Libyan intelligence, should have been prosecuted years ago. No loyal Mukhabarat operative would mount such an operation against civilian targets without orders from a superior. And these orders cannot be produced outside a strategic order to strike at the United States by the regime leader himself, Col. Moammar Gadhafi. The initial framing of the Lockerbie settlement is ridiculous: jailing an agent for a massacre ordered by the head of a regime. This was an act of terror against international law and should have been prosecuted by a special international tribunal at The Hague. Among the first officials to have been summoned should have been the dictator himself. Milosevic was brought in; Bashir was indicted; so should have been Gadhafi.

Tripoli’s madman, as Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and many other Arab leaders have called him, is not new to terrorism. Way before Lockerbie he funded scores of terror organizations in the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America. He has incited mass violence from the Philippines to India, let alone adopted extreme anti-Semitic rhetoric.

In 1978 he lured Lebanese Shia top cleric, Imam Musa al Sadr to Libya and executed him. He fomented coups in Tunisia and Egypt, and invaded Chad. The list is too long but memory seems to be very short on both sides of the Atlantic. Gadhafi’s prisons are tenfold Abu Ghraibs. Hundreds of political prisoners languish in dark cells.

After repetitive Libyan sponsored acts of terror, including against American military personnel in Germany, the U.S. responded on April 15, 1986, with an air raid on the regime’s military installations. Gadhafi most likely ordered the destruction of an American airliner in December 1988 as revenge, and possibly as well in conjunction with Iranian incitement. The massacre of Pan Am 103 was a regime-planned war crime, but was never punished as such.

As the decade came to an end and Mikhail Gorbachev brought about reforms, followed by the end of the Soviet Union, Gadhafi began a slow behavior change, his main backer having crumbled. Libya shrunk but didn’t end its involvement in terrorism and radicalization, particularly in Africa.

But with the crumbling of Saddam Hussein’s regime and his capture, Gadhafi moved quickly to cut a deal with the U.S. and the West. He let go, for the time being, of his nuclear ambitions, and accepted to offer financial compensation to the families of Pan Am 103. Instead of accepting responsibility, the Tripoli regime considered al-Megrahi as the single operative to be prosecuted and jailed, so that the case is closed.

Before:
Brown denies deal for Megrahi.
Jack Straw’s letter on Megrahi’s release
Scotland denies any oil deal in Mehgrahi case.
US offered money to stop Mehgrahi’s release.
Lockerbie bomber’s release: an oil deal.
On Lockerbie bomber’s release: an oil deal?
Gadhaffi’s son asks why so angry about Lockerbie bomber’s release.
More details on Lockerbie bomber’s health asked.
Victims from Lockerbie bomber against Gadhafi’s visit to NJ.

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4 Responses to “Lybia’s Gadhaffi: the forgotten story of his links to terror”

  1. […] Lybia’s Gadhaffi: the forgotten story of his links to terror. Brown denies deal for Megrahi. Jack Straw’s letter on Megrahi’s release Scotland […]

  2. […] Lockerbie bomber on show at Gadhafi’s 40th anniversary celebrations. Lybia’s Gadhaffi: the forgotten story of his links to terror. Brown denies deal for Megrahi. Jack Straw’s letter on Megrahi’s release Scotland […]

  3. […] about Lockerbie deal. Lockerbie bomber on show at Gadhafi’s 40th anniversary celebrations. Lybia’s Gadhaffi: the forgotten story of his links to terror. Brown denies deal for Megrahi. Jack Straw’s letter on Megrahi’s release Scotland […]

  4. […] Lybia’s Gadhaffi: the forgotten story of his links to terror. Will Lybia compensate IRA […]

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