Archive for CIA

John McCain on the “torture” debate

Posted in arrested terrorists, counterterrorism with tags , , , on August 31, 2009 by admin

Hulliq:

I think the interrogations were in violation of the Geneva Conventions and the convention against torture that we ratified under President Reagan. I think that these interrogations once publicized helped al Qaeda recruit. I got that from an al Qaeda operative in a prison camp in Iraq who told– who told me that.

I think that the ability of us to work with our allies was harmed and so– and I believe that information, according to the FBI and others, could have been gained through other methods.

Before:
Enhanced CIA interrogation on Khalil Sheikh Mohammed.
CIA accused of torturing terrorist by blowing cigar smoke at him.
Obama’s Attack on CIA 3.
Obama’s Attack on CIA 2.
Obama’s attack on CIA.

Enhanced CIA interrogation on Khalil Sheikh Mohammed

Posted in counterterrorism with tags , , , , on August 30, 2009 by admin

FOX Politics:

The inspector general’s report, released this week, says Mohammed wasn’t much help before he was waterboarded but went on to become “one of the U.S. government’s key sources on Al Qaeda.” Such revelations have fueled the fiery debate over the effectiveness of the CIA’s tactics and whether the United States should condone methods that many deem torture.

But additional details of his interactions with interrogators may raise more questions than they answer — potentially saying more about the captive than his captors.

Intelligence officials described to the Washington Post a scene almost out of the halls of academia, with the once-resistant high-level detainee giving “terrorist tutorials” to them in a makeshift lecture hall. He even scolded one listener for poor note-taking and his inability to recall details of an earlier lecture.

The CIA report makes it clear that Mohammed wasn’t willing to divulge much before interrogators resorted to the controversial tactics.

“KSM, an accomplished resistor, provided only a few intelligence reports prior to the use of the waterboard, and analysis of that information revealed that much of it was outdated, inaccurate or incomplete,” the report said.

But after he was subjected to waterboarding — or simulated drowning — and prolonged sleep deprivation, among other harsh interrogation techniques, Mohammed began to cooperate and apparently even enjoy revealing secrets.

….Mohammed, in statements to the International Committee of the Red Cross, said some of the information he provided was untrue.

“During the harshest period of my interrogation I gave a lot of false information in order to satisfy what I believed the interrogators wished to hear in order to make the ill-treatment stop. I later told interrogators that their methods were stupid and counterproductive. I’m sure that the false information I was forced to invent in order to make the ill-treatment stop wasted a lot of their time,” he said.

Critics say waterboarding and other harsh methods are unacceptable regardless of their results, and those with detailed knowledge of the CIA’s program say the existing assessments offer no scientific basis to draw conclusions about effectiveness.

“Democratic societies don’t use torture under any circumstances. It is illegal and immoral,” said Tom Parker, policy director for counterterrorism and human rights at Amnesty International. “This is a fool’s argument in any event. There is no way to prove or disprove the counterfactual.”

….”Once the harsher techniques were used on [detainees], they could be viewed as having done their duty to Islam or their cause, and their religious principles would ask no more of them,” said the former official, who requested anonymity because the events are still classified. “After that point, they became compliant. Obviously, there was also an interest in being able to later say, ‘I was tortured into cooperating.’ ”

…Mohammed was an unparalleled source in deciphering al-Qaeda’s strategic doctrine, key operatives and likely targets, the summary said, including describing in “considerable detail the traits and profiles” that al-Qaeda sought in Western operatives and how the terrorist organization might conduct surveillance in the United States.

Original story.

Before:
CIA accused of torturing terrorist by blowing cigar smoke at him.
Obama’s Attack on CIA 3.
Obama’s Attack on CIA 2.
Obama’s attack on CIA.

Obama’s attack on CIA 3

Posted in counterterrorism with tags , , , , on August 27, 2009 by admin

Release the Terrorist, Investigate the CIA – Andy McCarthy – The Corner on National Review Online

The most revealing portion of the IG report documents the program’s results. The CIA’s “detention and interrogation of terrorists has provided intelligence that has enabled the identification and apprehension of other terrorists and warned of terrorist plots planned for the United States and around the world.” That included the identification of Jose Padilla and Binyam Muhammed, who planned to detonate a dirty bomb, and the arrest of previously unknown members of an al Qaeda cell in Karachi, Pakistan, designated to pilot an aircraft attack in the U.S. The information also made the CIA aware of plots to attack the U.S. consulate in Karachi, hijack aircraft to fly into Heathrow, loosen track spikes to derail a U.S. train, blow up U.S. gas stations, fly an airplane into a California building, and cut the lines of suspension bridges in New York.

Though the Journal does not get into it, Binyam Mohammed was released outright by the Obama administration in February. He is now living freely in England. That’s our new counterterrorism approach: Release the terrorist who planned mass-murder attacks against U.S. cities but investigate the CIA agents who prevented mass-murder attacks against U.S. cities.

Obama’s Attack on CIA.
Obama’s attack on CIA 2.

Obama’s Attack on CIA 2

Posted in counterterrorism with tags , , on August 27, 2009 by admin

Jeffrey H. Smith, a counsel to the CIA during the Clinton years, explained all the reasons why a special prosecutor should not be appointed. The CIA has already prosecuted those interrogators who broke the rules. Career prosecutors at the Justice Department have already looked at this evidence and passed on the idea of prosecuting the agents. And President Obama has already ordered a change in the rules that offends the liberals so much. But the real reasons not to do this are the effects that this move will have on other national security efforts.

Obama’s Attack on CIA.

Obama’s Attack on CIA

Posted in foreign policy, terrorist attacks, violence with tags , , on August 27, 2009 by admin


By launching this latest attack on the CIA, the President has done more than merely throw a bone to his base.  He has removed all remaining doubt about how the US now plans to confront the global threat of radical Islam.  Simply put, we have reached one of those hinges of history whose swings alter the course of world events.

Meanwhile, JI terrorists were planning to kill Obama.